Digital Nomads. What you need to know.

Are you interested in becoming a digital nomad?

Digital nomads use modern technology to earn a living and conduct their lives in a nomadic lifestyle, whether from their homes or across the globe. Wireless internet, smartphones, VOIP and cloud-based applications are allowing more and more people to work remotely, untethered to a workplace.

While the lifestyle is growing in popularity, it is not without challenges. Here are some tips to help you decide if it’s for you and some skills to help you make a successful transition.

There are no off days

The good news is that you’re essentially the boss of your own company – You Inc. The bad news is that your company never really closes. The work hours will greatly depend upon what time zone you’re doing business with, so be prepared for early mornings and late nights. But that also means you can leave days open for other things, like visiting a new city.

j-pdxmrvyw4-joshua-earle

Learn to juggle

Most likely, you won’t be working with only one source of income, or client. So you will have to learn to juggle competing projects, each with its own rules, guidelines and topics. Some days you will love the variety and other days will tax you to no end.

r4he4btlsro-steven-lewis

Procrastination is a constant temptation

It’s not like there aren’t already enough things that tempt you to waste time.

However, when you are your own boss, nobody will be there to tell you to get to work, so you need to have plenty of self-discipline. Find the work rhythm that works for you and stick to it.

Work on skills that you can leverage

You’ll need to work on the skills you can leverage to build the life you want; you can’t simply declare yourself a digital nomad and expect everything to fall into place. So sit down and figure out the skills you have. Then, sharpen those skills and find the people who are looking for what you have to offer.

Most importantly, network, network, network. There are many communities built around the digital nomad lifestyle with plenty of great advice for building a successful career away from a traditional daily workplace. Meet other digital nomads and take advantage of their experience.

hmw698crnhe-clem-onojeghuo

 

Seize 2017

Money shouldn’t hold you back from real change in 2017

New Year’s resolutions are a time-honored tradition. As in, the ancient Babylonians were setting self-improvement goals 4,000 years ago. And just like us, they were soon breaking them. If you’ve made promises to yourself about some major lifestyle changes in 2017, chances are good you’ll start to see some slippage sooner rather than later.

This year, I will…

Lose weight.

Stop smoking.

Get in shape.

Save money.

Sound familiar?

Bumming a smoke – or just a Coke – from a co-worker. Those leftover Christmas cookies. Ordering a little more than your holiday gift card could cover. It happens.

The reason New Year’s resolutions usually fail is twofold: They’re overly ambitious, and they don’t come with tangible plans attached.

You can, of course, sign up for a weight loss program or gym membership – those places are swarming with motivated newbies this time of year. And that kind of support and commitment is one way to tip the odds in your favor. But you’ll do even better by stepping back and taking a breath before you make any promises to yourself.

Say you want to get in shape. Well, what does that even look like? If you’ve been lounging for years, you won’t be running marathons this June. Just not going to happen. You’re more likely to overextend, burn out and even hurt yourself if you go all-in with twice-daily workouts. Then, disappointed with yourself, you’re back on the couch.

So start small. Make a list of things you can realistically do. Then incorporate them into your life one at a time. Take the stairs at work for a month before you join that yoga class. Keep up the yoga for a month, then start meeting friends for walks.

The “transform by baby steps” principle isn’t new, but people who’ve made real change happen in their lives swear by it. If your goals are tied to money, the psychology becomes a little more complicated. It probably involves you telling yourself things like this:

“I don’t have enough money to do that.”

“More money would solve most of my problems.”

“Making less money would be irresponsible and selfish.”

“I have a secure career path and I’m sticking with it.”

When you take the time to really dream about that thing you’ve always wanted to do, you probably hear some of those self-defeating justifications. That’s because most people make terrible life coaches for themselves. Money is an easy thing to hang your insecurities on when the thing you’re really afraid of is taking a shot at your ultimate goal and failing.

Adam Savage of “MythBusters” fame is fond of saying, “Failure is always an option.” That’s because truly successful people have a string of failures in their pasts. Nothing worth doing is achieved without risk. Not opening your own bakery, writing that screenplay or traveling around the world. If you’re not chasing your dream, don’t blame it on money.

The Great Recession ripped the mask off money myths for millions. Here are some things the latest financial crash reminded us of:

You don’t need a lot of money to start a business.

Money in the bank doesn’t make you happier.

You can live on much less money than you do now.

No job is secure.

You’ll have more than one career before retirement – if retirement is even the ultimate goal.

Scary? Yes. But freeing, too. Yes, you might have family responsibilities – but those don’t have to include PlayStations and cable. Your true legacy could be one of ambition and excitement for those around you.

A new year doesn’t mean you should quit your job and buy a food truck if you can’t make a bologna sandwich. But 2017 can be the year you finally restore that muscle car in your dad’s shed, the year you actually enroll in a small business class, the year you get on a plane with nothing but a backpack and a map.

It’s easy to forget that money is just a tool to help us shape our lives according to our dreams. We’re not supposed to shape our dreams around accumulating more of it. Money isn’t the goal. A great life is.